Pashupatinath – Hope Is Within – Nepal (1/30/17)

Greetings from Nepal!

Thank you so much for your prayerful support of both us individually and as a team. We truly are experiencing the grace and goodness of God in a multitude of ways and I (Rachael) hope I can share a few of those things with you, our amazing family and friends!

Since being back in Katmandu we have actually been able to have some time to rest and process. Fewf! – because last week was our crazy week of teaching. We have had a few days of visiting children’s homes where we so evidently saw the goodness of God and redemption here on this earth. We were also able to spend time meeting with more of the Tiny Hands staff, learning more about  their ministries, and really wrapping up our time here. Throughout our days, many of us have had the opportunity to get to know and share our faith with our new Nepali friends and acquaintances. This time has been such a blessing and such a great time to really experience the hospitality found within the Nepali people and culture.

Finally, yesterday we had a chance to visit Pashupatinath, the largest Hindu temple in the world. At its base, what we saw was thousands of people solemnly worshiping idols and making sacrifices to images they had created. We also saw their cremation ceremonies and learned more about why they do what they do. Today, my task is expressing what this was like. I hope to give you a window into the depth of our experience there, but please realize that everyone is thinking about it in very different ways. I guarantee everyone still has quite a bit to process, and yet has had profound insight into the message of the Gospel and the meaning of hope. I am also in the mist of this processing but I have decided to include a few excerpts from my journal to give you a taste of this place and all the ideas that we are wrestling with. Please continue to pray for wisdom in our discussion and processing, even after we head home tomorrow.

A Window into Hinduism

An overload of sights, smells, and sounds were exuded from the layers of activity below our lookout at Pashupatinath, the largest Hindu temple in the world. The Hindu Mecca of Sorts. A place where every Hindu is to come at least once before their death. Nestled on the edge of the Baghmati River with an outlet leading to the River Ganges, this compound serves as the holy place of sacrifice, worship, hospice, and cremation. Essentially representing an entire cycle of both life and death. An entire cycle void of hope. Significant imagery stuck with me as I sat there, bringing me a rush of emotions but also greater understanding for Hinduism and people. These are the images that will remain etched into my mind and heart:

Coins falling – As people threw coins from the balcony in a desperate attempt for them to land on the lucky Red Stone far below, this sound was the methodic clink of the hopeless in their grappling attempt at salvation.

Water splashing – Water splashed up from the Baghmati as people adorned themselves and the Shiva Lingaa with water meant to cleanse and honor. These repeated splashes struck me as so desperate and so resigned. They were completing a task and a tradition. I didn’t sense any heart behind it all.

Woman Wailing – A woman wailed as she watched their eldest son light a torch in the mouth of his father. An ancient tradition dedicated to the Hindu culture. This woman screamed an inconsolable scream. Mourning as those who have no hope. After these wails came a quiet emptiness that crept in to settle into the air and her heart.

Drum Beating – A solitary drum beat in the background. A heart with no purpose or rhythm

Bells ringing – The quiet deed throated ring of bells sobered the mood rather than lifting it. The sounds of worship to gods so small, self-constructed and unworthy.

Pigeons Spreading – Ever so often, seemingly unprovoked, a flock of pigeons would undo themselves from their unassuming perch on the rocks below. They were the quiet bystanders. No apparent say in what was going on, yet kind of an eerie presence. As if they were the overseers of a dubious plot. As they flew they added a sense of surreal. We were the quiet bystanders as we sat helpless to the reality below us.

Carnations Adorning – Orange carnations. A symbol of peace. The peoples’ prayer for the dead bodies and phallus they adorned.

Smoke Billowing – The smell of smoke rose from the piles, instilling a slight pressure behind the opening in my nose. This smoke is ash. This ash is flesh. Our tissues came away black.

Monkeys Stealing – Set by the water was a basket. In that basket was a banana. The sacrifice of a people grasping at every attempt for a life of Maksha, or heaven. I watched as a monkey stole the banana. What happens when a monkey steals your sacrifice?

Flame Waning – A woman lit a small leaf to place in the holy river. Try and try with all her might she wafted it to enter into the current. Try and try with all her might, this sacrifice would never be enough.

Baby Smiling – A bright and shining face. A ray of joy amidst the pain.

Weight Lifting – A heavy weight seemed to be in the air. And on our hearts. The oppression of these people felt tangible. This weight is the weight lifted by the cross.

Vivid Truth of the Gospel and Hope

While there seemed to be a great darkness in this place, I also felt the Holy Spirit within me like I hadn’t many times before. I realized how lost they were and just the emptiness of it all, but I simultaneously realized the weight of my own sins and true gift of salvation. When Jesus said, “forgive them Father, for they know not what they do” he was talking about me. My sins held him there and I put in that nail. This picture below me, the full cycle of life, death, and cremation without hope is what His death and resurrection saved me from. I was pulled out of the depths of death and despair and eternity in hell. And I have the Holy Spirit within me. Communing with the Father without my help. Seeing these cremations on the piles. Hearing the hopeless wailing. These are tangible representations of their souls which are eternally separated from you and today began their first days in hell.  This is reality. This is the world and the result of the fall. The gospel message is one of urgency.

Along with this, I also realized how truly intertwined the hope of salvation is within me. How set apart that is from the world apart from Christ. The power and true gift of salvation and the gospel is so vivid throughout today. I have no fear in death and instead look forward to eternity spent in worship to the one true King. And I know that even if I got to the end of my life and it turned out that eternity was a hoax along with Christianity and God and Jesus, my life spent in worship and dedication of the Lord would be worth it. I life rich in hope, service, love, and security in the Lord is such an unbelievable and truly awesome gift. To be able to celebrate in life and celebrate in death and everything in between is powerful. It is a good and beautiful truth that I firmly believe s only found in the gospel, of Christ.

This was our experience but what do with that?

Dichotomy of Justice and Mercy

Psalm 106 describes this dichotomy between justice and mercy according to what we saw yesterday, or at least begins to. It starts out by declaring the goodness and enduring love of the Lord. This is from a place of praise, gratefulness, and remembrance. It then goes on to describe a portion of the history of Israel where God’s people resorted to worshiping idols. “They exchanged their Glory for an image of a bull, which eats grass (v. 20).” Accordingly, to God’s judgment was threated and he wanted to destroy them. A totally justified act in response to their turning away from him. This both reminds me so vividly of Hinduism and what we saw at Pashupatinath but also of my own heart. A heart so easily ready to “forget the God that saved me (v. 21).” We stand and declare that God is good.

Power of Prayer

That’s not the end, however. Verse 33 goes on to say “so He said he would destroy them – had not Moses, his chosen one, stood in the breach before him to keep his wrath from destroying them.” Because of my identity with Jesus, I am God’s chosen one, a deeply loved child of God. I can claim my inheritance with boldness and confidence that the Holy Spirit is within me and I have power over temptation and evil. My prayers carry weight. My intercession has power. As I stood over these people sacrificing to and praising imaged of cows and phalluses and so much more, I just begged God to save them from this. What they are doing is such evil in the sight of the Lord. They defined themselves with feeble replacements for the one true God. So lost and with trust so misplaced. I prayed and interceded. I don’t know that power it had but I know that just like Moses, my prayers are heard. I also know, because of my own sin nature and reading God’s word, how stubborn and vile we are as humans. Even after Moses’ intercession in verse 23, the people continued to defile and prostitute themselves. Verse 43 says, “many times he delivered them, but they were bent on rebellion and the wasted away in their sin.”

I think of this Hindu culture and the stagnation and hopeless cycle of fatalism, karma, and unattainable dharma. They strive and try and yet stagnate. They live in fear and sadness in death. I compare it to our culture (which is suffering and broken in so many ways) that is set upon Christian morals and founded in Biblical principles. Many times I forget that but here this stark contrast is apparent. Here there is extreme poverty, economic failure, and extensive governmental corruption. There are so many signs of redemption and God’s work, let that not be minimized. However, when it comes down to it, fatalism and pagan values reign as the large scale influencers. A culture and country resorts to selling their own daughters as sex slaves. In essence, “sacrificing their sons and their daughters to demons (v 37)” This is the harsh and horrible reality. Not one much different than the situation of the Israelites thousands of years prior.

In the case of the Israelites, “But he took note of their distress. He heard their cry. For their sake he remembered his covenant and out of His great love He relented (v. 44)”.  Relent Lord that these Nepali people might know and understand your great love!

For His Name’s Sake

“Yet he saved them for His name’s sake, to make His mighty power known (v. 8)”. This saving, this grace, this opportunity for mercy is not about US. It’s not about me or even these millions of lost people. It’s about the Lord. Each act of mercy, love, and grace presented by the Lord is to make His name great and to make His mighty power known. This is not my choice. Nor would I want it to be. This is the nature of justice and who God is. God is a just God. How could God possibly embody love if he just saved even those who don’t ask? Those who continually defile his name, his power, and his might. This is not an easy thing to accept and something I will continue to struggle with because these people are my people. These people are my family. My friends. These are the people who smile at me and that God uses to brighten my day. His image is in them. Such is the nature of the power of God. And yet these same people that reflect Jesus and His image are also rebelling and wasting away. My heart breaks for them. It doesn’t feel fair that I was born in privilege and born loved by my family and with an early knowledge of Jesus and His sacrifice. But this is reality.  This is truth. What is my response?

Urgency of the Gospel

This is the urgency of the gospel. That I would feel the weight of injustice that people made in the image of God would be born into bondage both to man and the devil. That their souls, vividly analogous to the cremation piles, are now destined for Hell. This doesn’t feel fair. This is hard to accept. And yet God has decided to bless me as his chosen people to live in love and with urgency.

God is still a good God. If anything, His goodness is made known to me more fully after today. He is a God that deserves our lives and to be worshiped and adored, not defiled and rebelled against. My sins held Him on that cross and it is only by grace that I am made new and made free. This world is not yet complete. May I live in light of my inheritance and broken for the people who spend their entire life in bondage. Set them free.

Children’s Home – A Stark Contrast

After Pashupatinath we went to a children’s home to spend some time with the kids. They sang songs about how they will follow God no matter how high the mountain is they must climb, or how low the valley is that they must stoop. They sang in the most beautiful and pure voices. The kind that only come from children. These children were the body of Christ. This was our encouragement: a new generation of believers. These were children saved from lives on the streets and in prostitution. These children have hope. They have joy. Life. Community. Family. Belonging. Place. Access to truth. They had beautiful smiles showing that they knew their value and dignity. Their smiles showed that they knew they were loved. They were made complete, not by the works of man but of Christ. This is hope. This is this gospel. This is the kingdom here on earth.

Rachael Fuller

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BORDER VISIT – Joy Amidst the Pain (1/13/17)

Hello friends and family!

Thank you for your immense prayer and support. It is incredible to know how many people are praying for us in the U.S. We know that prayer is powerful and effective and it is evident in how the Lord is working here in Nepal.

It is hard for me to express in words what we have just experienced. To give an overview, our team was split into two groups. Each group flew to a different border location. Both groups had very different experiences and were impactful in various ways. I will speak specifically to my group’s experience and my personal feelings and reflections.

We left Kathmandu for the airport at about 7:40 a.m. on Wednesday morning Nepali time. We were met by a Nepali Tiny Hands staff member who was our guide for the border trip. She was absolutely incredible and a complete blessing to us. She revealed the character of Christ in such a beautiful way. She had a gentle and sweet spirit but she was also a strong leader. There is no way we could have done anything without her. Our flight was delayed for several hours so we had plenty of time to get to know her.

Once we boarded, our flight was a quick 20 minutes or so. Our guide decided that we would take electric rickshaws (somewhat like a golf cart) to the hotel. It is hard to describe this ride. The border town we were in is not a tourist destination. Therefore, we were the only white people. The stares we received were pretty extreme. Everyone seemed to be so interested in us and why we would travel this town. The town was loaded with people…bicycle rickshaws…electric rickshaws…horses…dogs…cows…buses…people selling everything imaginable…children…and so much more. Sounds could be heard of people trying to sell certain items…animal noises…people talking in Nepali…bells ringing…Nepali music playing…and hundreds of buses and rickshaws honking their horns. There were moments when we were completely surrounded by people. So close that my knee or arm would be touching someone. Kids would laugh as they passed us and we would wave. Women and men would look at us and then take a second and third look.

We arrived at the hotel and settled in and had a meal. We were surprised to have heat in our rooms which was a great luxury. We then took another adventurous electric rickshaw ride to the Tiny Hands shelter. In order to get to the shelter, we had to walk through a construction site. This was honestly one of the only moments that I felt somewhat scared. We had to walk on a section that was slightly larger than a balance beam with a large drop on either side. It was dusty, rocky and uneven. Thankfully, none of else fell and we made it safely to the shelter.

We were greeted by several women and the pastor. We were given a tour of the shelter and we were able to have about an hour and a half of question and answer time. It was incredible to talk to these incredible staff members. We discussed the whole process about how the interceptions work, what their prayer needs are, how their jobs impact their faith and much more. What surprised us the most is that the border control monitors at this location are females aging from about 20 to 22. If that weren’t surprising enough, the woman are less than 5 feet tall.

 

These women are absolute warriors of God. They wake up to work the station sometimes at around 5 a.m. One of the females lives close to the airport, which is a far distance away, and travels every single day by herself. We were somewhat confused about how this would work at the border station but they explained that they have connections with the police and the girls also have badges. Once they show a trafficker their badge, they are taken much more seriously. It was also interesting to think from the victim’s perspective. It makes sense that a young girl would be more willing to listen to a young, Nepali female in this situation. This is not something that I expected and it was incredible to see the faith of these young women. When we began to thank them for their work, they seemed somewhat surprised. They do not seek recognition for what they do. They do it because it is what the Lord has called them to.
The main prayer request that they told us was for safety for the staff, specifically for the young women as they travel to and from the border station each day.

After visiting the home, we left to visit the actual border. We took electric rickshaws once again and it was quite an adventure. It soon became dark as we traveled. We were in two separate rickshaws and became separated due to one with a lower battery and thus slower speed. Dust was flying everywhere. The streets were extremely busy with every type of vehicle you can imagine. The street was lined with shops, broken down buildings and people’s homes. The poverty was very overwhelming to me. There are not words to describe this scene.

Upon arrival at the actual border, I was amazed. It was nothing like I expected it to be. It was very wide, crowded, and people and vehicles could easily pass through. No wonder it is so easy for Nepali girls to be trafficked into India. We were not able to go all the way into India but we were able to get into the neutral zone between Nepal and India. Thankfully, our two rickshaws found each other and the pastor shared a few words about where we were. Due to the time, we had to turn back.

This ride back was personally very heavy for me. I could not believe where I was. This was a place where hundreds of people have lost their lives. Once a person is tricked or forced to cross that border, he or she may never come back. I could not stop thinking about the thousands of girls that have been taken over that border to become a sex slave. I couldn’t stop thinking about how many girls have died due to being beaten, drugged and raped. The seriousness and the realness of the sex trade washed over me and all I could do was shed a tear in the chaos. Melody sat across from me and even in the dark she could sense my pain and comforted me.

What upset me even more was our natural American ways. We are so privileged in ways that we do not even understand. We complain when we have to skip a few meals or if we can’t take a warm shower while others are trying to figure out how to stay alive each day. The drastic contrast in lifestyle is something that I am not sure how to process. I recognized how much I take for granted and I was simply overwhelmed by the injustice I was observing.

I want you all to know that even though this was a very heavy night for me, there was a plethora of joy as well. In the other rickshaw, I was told that the group had a blast getting to know one of the border monitor woman that joined them. They chatted as best they could with the language barrier and they even sang worship songs.

We have processed a lot tonight. We have talked about how there is always joy amidst the pain and that we must remember that God is sovereign. There are moments when I simply have to say, “God, I do not understand but I trust you.” I cannot let Satan use the pain of the sex trade against me. Sometimes I feel helpless but what I am really learning on this trip is the power of prayer. Prayer is a sword against the enemy and we must realize its importance in this world! Prayer is a threat to the darkness. Prayer is a threat against human trafficking.
Once we arrived back at the hotel, we said goodbye to the Tiny Hands members and had dinner. We went to bed early and had breakfast together this morning. Upon leaving the hotel, a big group of Nepali, male students approached us and asked if they could take a photo of us as many others stared at us. What an experience! We left for the airport and got there with only 20 minutes before our flight. We had no trouble making the flight (a little different than the U.S.).

We arrived back in Kathmandu and met the rest of the team for lunch. It was so exciting to all be together again! We then had time to journal and pack for Pokhara. We split up for a dinner and then came back to the hotel for a time of worship, sharing and prayer. It was great to be together to process what we had just experienced and to pray for the Tiny Hands staff and for each other.

I want to conclude by stating that the Lord is good. The border experience was incredible and I am so thankful that I was able to witness this first hand. There was a lot of darkness, but nothing compared to the light that I saw. God is working in Nepal. God is a vibrant light through so many Nepali believers. Even though we have witnessed a plethora of darkness, it is nothing compared to the power we have seen through the name of Jesus being proclaimed.

The song “God of this City” was actually written and sang for the first time in a bar/brothel in Thailand. Aaron Boyd, from a church in Belfast, simply began to sing out what he believed God was saying over the city he was in. And I feel that the lyrics are perfect too for the nation of Nepal.
You’re the God of this city
You’re the King of these people
You’re the Lord of this nation
You are

You’re the light in this darkness
You’re the hope to the hopeless
You’re the peace to the restless
You are

There is no one like our God
There is no one like our God

For greater things have yet to come
And greater things are still to be done in this city
For greater things have yet to come
And greater things are still to be done here

Thank you all for your support and love!

In Christ,

Fayth Glock

 

PRAYER REQUESTS:

  • There are a few of us that are less than 100% health wise right now. Prayers for good health and healing would be appreciated!
  • Pokhara teaching – many team members are feeling nervous about teaching for a week. Prayers for courage and confidence would be great. We have just one education major so this will be an adventure! Pray that we can be a light for these children.
  • Travel – Tomorrow we have a seven hour bus ride.
  • Leadership – prayers for Erika and Chad as they continue to lead the team with such care, love and strength

Our focus – prayer that we can be focused not on ourselves but on the Lord and what He wants us to do each day. Pray that we are open to the Spirit and listening for His guidance

Making Connections (1/10/17)

Today was an eventful day for the Nepal team! We started by visiting Beauty for Ashes, a company that employs women who have been victims of sex trafficking or who are at high risk. The women work to make jewelry, clothing, and accessories by hand and earn living wages in an environment where they are encouraged to learn how much God loves them no matter what is in their past. Our team had the opportunity to pray over the building and the ministry there. We were filled with joy at the redemptive work God is doing through Beauty for Ashes while remembering the many women who are still enslaved. We are so thankful for the individual lives touched by God already and pray for freedom and salvation for many more.

We were also able to meet with the owner of Café Bethesda and hear his heart for his ministry there. Although the building is still under construction, his vision is that it will be a lighthouse for the nation of Nepal. Just like in the Bible where people would come to Bethesda to seek healing as the angel stirred up the water, his prayer is that his café will be a place where people can feel the presence of God. We prayed over the beginnings of the building and worshipped God for the work He will do, and has already done, in that place.

After lunch we went to two separate children’s homes to hang out with the kids there. They are all taken away from high-risk situations and brought up in a Christian environment with parents who love them like their own kids. This was my favorite part of the day because their smiles and excitement to see us melted my heart! We played games, performed skits, and even sang “Jingle Bells” with them. We prayed for their futures with them before we left.

Finally, we ate dinner in the home of a kind refugee and his family. He told us his story of how he had been persecuted for his faith and had to flee to Nepal. It was incredible to meet a member of the persecuted church in person and hear the harsh realities of what many of our brothers and sisters experience because they are bold enough to proclaim the name “Jesus”. We prayed for him and his family as they continue to seek refuge and thanked God for saving them from the hands of their persecutors.

Although it was a long day, it was an encouraging one to hear how God’s mighty hand is at work here. There may be pain in Nepal, but God is stronger still and we can’t help but worship Him for the joy that only He can bring amidst it all. Thank you all for your continued prayers. Our team is all healthy and learning so much already. Praise God from whom our help comes. He neither slumbers nor sleeps. Praise the Lord!

-Melody

Exploring Nepal (1/6/2017)

After almost 36 hours of travel our team arrived safely in Kathmandu; the prayers of our supporters could be noticed and felt throughout the entirety of the experience, and as we continue our time in Nepal. The Lord has shown himself to us through our very first impressions of a new culture. Getting to see the beauty of the mountains and even in the crowded and chaotic city has already deepened our reverence for Him who created it. Our first day we were able to explore the streets of the city to get to know our new home for the next month; we were able to interact with the Nepali people who have drive and passion for their businesses and creations. The sights and smells and pace of the streets are new to us but are an opportunity for us to learn. In transit our layover was in Qatar, one of the most affluent countries in the world. We moved from staying in a five star hotel to a third world, so the contrast was drastic and revealed a lot to us about the brokenness of the place we will be staying. But, after only two days of life in Nepal, we’ve learned how joy and beauty can be found even still. Climbing up the many stairs to the Monkey Temple rewarded us with a view of the city surrounded by mountains, and an exposure to a culture and way of life different than our own. We are blessed with an opportunity to take time out of our year to devote to listening intentionally and intently to what the Lord is telling us. Through learning more intensely about Tiny Hands International we know more about the injustices happening in the world but also how people are following the call of the Lord and actively fighting against it in the name of our God. We are so excited to be able to learn more about how the Lord has created his people alongside learning how to respectfully serve, and in any community we find ourselves. Please pray with us that our team will continue to find joy in dark places, that we will better learn how to encourage each other as a family in the Kingdom of God, and that every day with every interaction we will grow in our ability to serve and love others as Jesus exemplified through His ministry on earth. Thank you so much for your encouragement and prayers; they make an incredible difference to us.

“Jaimasi” from Nepal

Jaimasi!

The proper way to greet someone in Nepali is to say “Namaste,” however, when you greet someone who is a Christian, you would instead say, “jaimasi” which means, “Praise the Lord.” This ends up feeling sort of like a secret code or sorts, one in which we got to use quite a bit yesterday morning.

Saturday is the Sabbath for the Nepali people, so we went to Gyaneshwor Church in Kathmandu, which is actually the largest and oldest church celebrating its 60th year in Nepal. We were provided headsets for translations during the sermon and times of prayer, which proved very helpful. During times of worship, however, there was no translation. This was my first time in a church in a different country and it was incredible. Despite the language difference, the presence of the Lord was so apparent. For me, this was a beautiful representation of the Kingdom. We all worshipped the same God and were all united by the same Spirit.

After this we went to a boy’s home set up by Tiny Hands. This is a home for boys that previously lived on the streets and is one of many homes that Tiny Hands has in Kathmandu. Each home has house parents who care for the children and teach them the Gospel. These homes also provide an education for the children up to a Bachelor’s degree. Minutes after arriving at the house we had a moment of impromptu worship when one of the boys brought out his guitar. After this we walked to the dirt field where these boys frequently play and engaged in some intense games of soccer and fun with them. The joy these boys had playing soccer and joking around with us was rewarding for everyone involved.

Even after the first few days it is so clear that God is already moving in such beautiful ways in Nepal. Thank you for your continued prayers. Specifically, it would be incredible if you could be praying that we can love and be Christ to everyone that we meet. In a country in which it is strongly discouraged to share the Gospel, we are seeking ways to shine light in the darkness.

God is good. Much love all.

Gabe Short

First Update from Nepal -(1/6/2017)

After almost 36 hours of travel our team arrived safely in Kathmandu; the prayers of our supporters could be noticed and felt throughout the entirety of the experience, and as we continue our time in Nepal. The Lord has shown himself to us through our very first impressions of a new culture. Getting to see the beauty of the mountains and even in the crowded and chaotic city has already deepened our reverence for Him who created it. Our first day we were able to explore the streets of the city to get to know our new home for the next month; we were able to interact with the Nepali people who have drive and passion for their businesses and creations. The sights and smells and pace of the streets are new to us but are an opportunity for us to learn. In transit our layover was in Qatar, one of the most affluent countries in the world. We moved from staying in a five star hotel to a third world, so the contrast was drastic and revealed a lot to us about the brokenness of the place we will be staying. But, after only two days of life in Nepal, we’ve learned how joy and beauty can be found even still. Climbing up the many stairs to the Monkey Temple rewarded us with a view of the city surrounded by mountains, and an exposure to a culture and way of life different than our own. We are blessed with an opportunity to take time out of our year to devote to listening intentionally and intently to what the Lord is telling us. Through learning more intensely about Tiny Hands International we know more about the injustices happening in the world but also how people are following the call of the Lord and actively fighting against it in the name of our God. We are so excited to be able to learn more about how the Lord has created his people alongside learning how to respectfully serve, and in any community we find ourselves. Please pray with us that our team will continue to find joy in dark places, that we will better learn how to encourage each other as a family in the Kingdom of God, and that every day with every interaction we will grow in our ability to serve and love others as Jesus exemplified through His ministry on earth. Thank you so much for your encouragement and prayers; they make an incredible difference to us.

Team Nepal Arrival – (1/5/2017)

The Lighthouse staff just received word that the Nepal team has arrived safely and with all of their luggage (which it seems they were pretty excited about.) This now means that all of the Lighthouse teams have reached their destinations! Nepal is going to rest up for a bit before starting their orientation.

 

Meet the Nepal Team of 2017

World, meet our 2017 Nepal team! Would you mind praying for them this week? They will be learning about the injustices of the world, specifically in Nepal. They will be interacting and loving on street children. They’ll be teaching in a school for an entire week on their own. They will be encouraging our long-term host…and a whole slew of other opportunities to share the truth and love of Jesus Christ to those around them.

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